The Beauty And The Beast Book Tag

beauty and the beast tag

 

So Nut Free Nerd had left an open nomination for this one, and this challenge sounded SO cute that I HAD to do it. Thanks, Holly! And thanks to Amber Elise at Du Livre for creating this one!

Surprisingly, I’ve neither watched the animated movie nor the live-action one that everyone’s in love with. These last two years have been quite hectic, and the next two seem to continue in that vein, so I’ll have to find time to watch them 😦

Now for the fun part.

villain

A villain you can’t help but love.

sword of summer

Loki from Magnus Chase and the Gods of Asgard series ( *confession* TOM HIDDLESTON’S GOT NOTHING TO DO WITH THIS *end of confession*).

I’ve always empathised with Loki – his conflicting morals, his inferiority complex, his raging passions…. I’ve always felt that his punishment for killing Balder was too harsh. And have I mentioned how cool shape-shifting is?

OTP

 

Your OTP. 

half-blood prince

This is easily the hardest question, because I ship most characters with myself 😛

But after a few centuries of thought, I can say that I thoroughly ship Remus Lupin and Nymphadora Tonks (S.S Wotcher Wolvie or Ronks).

This is a thoroughly disputed ship – many have called out on Remus for being selfish and too drowned in self-pity to have actually reciprocated Tonks’ love wholly. And they may be right.

But the fact still remains that their love is redeeming – Tonks saved Remus from what could have been a descent into darkness and despair; and he stabilises her wildfire personality. It’s sad that their love had to end in tragedy, but thank God for Teddy Lupin.

destined for bigger things

A character that’s destined for bigger things.

home and the world

Bimala from Tagore’s The Home and the World. Let’s be honest, EVERY character in this book was destined for greater things. But Bimala stands out. Her transformation from a woman who worshiped the dust of her husband’s feel (literally) to a firebrand personification of Bharat Mata was just awe-inspiring. Had it not been for this book’s ambiguous ending, I’m sure we would have seen some greater magic being cast by Tagore.

 

 

food

A book that makes you hungry. 

a little princess

Umm. This question was hard because I always munch on something while reading, so that I don’t need to get up to fetch a snack (#lazy bookworm problems). But Frances Hodgson Burnett’s A Little Princess ends up warming my heart and making me a little hungry because of all the mentions of food in it.

So many feasts, so many secret feasts, so many happy feasts…. *sigh* Time to grab a snack, I guess.

 

opposites attract

Opposites attract.

the hunger games

Katniss Everdeen and Peeta Mellark.

One bakes bad guys while the other bakes bread (bad one, I know).

One is the Girl on Fire –  stubborn and determined. The other is gentle and steady.

One speaks her mind while the other weighs his words carefully before utterance.

‘Nuff said.


I tag whoever is reading this!

What are your reasons for watching Beauty And The Beast? What books would you have chosen for these questions? And is there any way of freeing up a busy schedule? *cries*

Let me know in the comments below!

 

 

Happy 400, Will

celebrating-william-shakespeare-5125440101416960.2-hp

Lovely Google Doodle here

 

 

We know what we are, but know not what we may be.

William Shakespeare

The first work of Shakespeare’s that I read was an abridged version of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, back when I was eight. I remember being enthralled by the beautiful name of the play. Whoa, I thought. Think about combining midnight and summer.

Then, the sheer number of characters attracted me: Titania, Puck,  Oberon. And the love quadrilateral with people of similar names. I remember having a headache trying to differentiate between Hermia and Helena, and their confusing loves. A petty eight-year-old, no wonder.

Now, I’m much older, and having read some more Shakespeare (and other authors), I feel that an average human lifespan is not enough to appreciate his insight into life.

Here’s to a happy 400 years of peace and quiet to William Shakespeare. You will love long in our hearts. You have lived quite long there, actually. Whatever.

Cheers!

Mads

#5 Top Ten Tueday

Late again! Yesterday’s prompt wanted us to name our ALL-TIME favourite authors. Pretty exciting prompt!  Here are my top ten favourites:

10. Enid Blyton –  With Secret Seven, Famous Five, and The Magic Faraway Tree, she kindled the fire of reading in me.

9. Roald Dahl – Oh Matilda! Oh Esiotrot! Oh The Fantastic Mr.Fox! Roald Dahl brightened my childhood with his innovative and quirky stories.

8. Ruskin Bond – Quite the children’s writer and a YA writer too! From The Room On The Roof and Our Trees Still Grow in Dehra, he made me cry and laugh in turn with his stunning description of nature and gave words to emotions we couldn’t name.

7. Agatha Christie – My cousin compelled me to read Evil Under The Sun until I went out of my mind. By far, she’s one of the best crime writers the world has ever seen.

6. Kalki Krishnamurthi – Ponniyin Selvan ( The Son Of The Ponni River ) is one of the most majestic historical romances ever written by him. I am unfortunate to not know enough Tamil to read this book, but even in English, I was attracted by his vivid descriptions and intriguing story for the throne of the Cholas.

5. Frances Hodgson Burnett – Anybody who has read The Little Princess or The Secret Garden will know my reasons for selecting her. If you haven’t read them…well, give it a shot, and you’ll understand.

4. Louisa May Alcott – Of Little Women fame, her stories are always delightfully beautiful.

3. Suzanne Collins – The Hunger Games says all I ever wanted to say about her.

2. Rick Riordan – Percy Jackson And The Olympians shook me like anything. I developed a great love for mythology, and had split my sides laughing with Percy’s description of the Gods.

1. J.K. Rowling – Rightfully tops my list along with Harry Potter.

Who are YOUR favourite authors? Tell us in by commenting below!

#2 Top Ten Tuesday

Today’s prompt wants us to list ten books in our never-ending TBR list. I had the Hunger Games trilogy in it for over a year, but now that I’ve read it, I feel a bit…empty.

Anyway, here are the books:

10. War Horse by Michael Morpurgo – I’m a sucker for animal stories, and I read Morpurgo’s short story, The Best Christmas Present In The World. I was an immediate fan.

9. My Left Foot by Christy Brown – An autobiography of a man with cerebral palsy. I read an excerpt once. I was moved to tears. Definitely a must read.

8. Mrityunjaya by Shivaji Sawant – I don’t know Marathi, so I need a translation. But anything about Karna deserves reading.

7. The Tenant At Wildfell Hall by Anne Bronte – The plot intrigued me, so why not? No problem in taking risks!

6. Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte – Classical reading is important, I guess.

5. Goddess Of Spring by P.C. Cast – Waiting for the day I’ll turn eighteen…

4. The Fault In Our Stars by John Green – Not in my stars to read this book, I guess. Waiting…

3. Ponniyin Selvan Series by Kalki – My mom has been bugging me to read this ‘historical romance’ from as long as I can remember. Since it’s in Tamil, I’ll need a translated version, which, thankfully, is available.

2. Artemis Fowl Series by Eoin Colfer – I read the first book when I was too young to understand it, so back it goes into TBR.

1. Divergent Series by Veronica Roth – I have bought it (finally), so I guess in a few days, it will no longer be in my TBR list. I am so excited!!!

Have you read any of these books? What do you think about them? What are the books in your TBR list?

Book Review: The Secret Garden

The Secret Garden

Quite magical, isn’t it?

“Where you tend a rose my lad, a thistle cannot grow.”

Ben Weatherstaff

Title –  The Secret Garden

Author – Frances Hodgson Burnett

Pages – 331

Genre – Classics

I read this book as a part of my Re-Read Challenge, and man, I can’t believe I’ve forgotten everything about it!

The story revolves around Mary Lennox, an India-born young girl who loses her parents to cholera. A sour-faced, unpleasant girl, she moves to Yorkshire to her uncle’s house, and to her horror, finds that people behave differently than they did in India.

Soon, she learns about the ‘secret garden’ that belonged to her aunt, who had died there. Distraught, her uncle locks away the garden and throws its key away. Mary is curious to know more about it and tries to find it.

Put together a boy who can char animals, a hypochondriac who behaves like a prince, some Yorkshire slang, and lots of Magic, you have a typical Burnett book – magical and charming.

Despite all it’s beauty, I hated the racist point of view that the narrator has towards India. It is completely different from what she portrays, and she twists history according to her own whims and fancies. But seeing that racism wasn’t a crime back then, I (generously) forgive her.

The part I love the most about this is the transformation of the selfish, wicked, Mary to an angel who wins everyone’s heart by the end. Filled with hope and positivity, you are sure to love this everlasting classic.

I’ll rate it **** out of *****.

Have you read this book? What do you think about it?

#1 Top Ten Tuesday

Hosted by the Broke and the Bookish, I discovered this awesome meme all thanks to Nut Free Nerd and Bloggiesta!

Today’s prompt are the top ten books from my childhood that I’d love to revisit. Thankfully, I’ve many such books that have left a lasting impression on me.

10. The Three Musketeers by Alexander Dumas – Though it is considered a pretty boyish book, I loved it.

9. Little Women by Louisa May Alcott – A simple story of the trials and tribulations of four sisters, this series had me crying and laughing in turns.

8. Percy Jackson and the Olympians by Rick Riordan – This book was a huge part of my middle-school days, and I’d love to read it again.

7. Evil Under The Sun by Agatha Christie – This is the first Christie I ever read, and had me completely enthralled by Hercule Poirot.

6. Thomasina by Paul Gallico – Absolutely magical story of a cat with three lives.

5. Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery – Classic. That one word describes everything about this series.

4. A Little Princess by Frances Hodgson Burnett – I started believing in Magic only when I read this book. Must read for everyone!

3. Harry Potter by J.K. Rowling – Who doesn’t like this series? An integral  part of everyone’s childhood!

2. The Heroes of Olympus by Rick Riordan – This series is racy, pacy, thrilling, chilling, and whatever other adjectives you’d use to describe a YA book.

1. The Magic Faraway Tree by Enid Blyton – The magical feeling this series gives is unmatched by anything else I’ve read so far!