Gallery

Personal Space

infp-aesthetic

This is me in my me-zone, and this place is pretty sacred to me.

 

via Daily Prompt: Sacred

Pingback!

Advertisements

Delights of Dawn and Dusk

In a magical place, faraway,

Away from the hustle-bustle of today,

The stunning sapphire sea meets the sparkling sand,

A scene both magnificent and grand.

The colours change from blue to red

As all the darkness of the night is shed.

The sky goes to every shade it can find

As if it can’t quite make up its mind.

Then suddenly, a warm amber glow

Spreads in the sky, warming every soul.

The golden sun rises up and shines,

Rousing the sleeping creepers and vines.

A medley of colours brighten up the day

Showing the path, lighting the way.

From the awesome orange to the beautiful blue

To the welcoming white of the crystalline dew.

As dusk creeps in, the colours fade

To an enchanting mauvish shade.

The majestic sun makes its departure

As the world watches in silent rapture.

For Poetry 101 Rehab.

Book Review: The Secret Garden

The Secret Garden

Quite magical, isn’t it?

“Where you tend a rose my lad, a thistle cannot grow.”

Ben Weatherstaff

Title –  The Secret Garden

Author – Frances Hodgson Burnett

Pages – 331

GenreClassics

I read this book as a part of my Re-Read Challenge, and man, I can’t believe I’ve forgotten everything about it!

The story revolves around Mary Lennox, an India-born young girl who loses her parents to cholera. A sour-faced, unpleasant girl, she moves to Yorkshire to her uncle’s house, and to her horror, finds that people behave differently than they did in India.

Soon, she learns about the ‘secret garden’ that belonged to her aunt, who had died there. Distraught, her uncle locks away the garden and throws its key away. Mary is curious to know more about it and tries to find it.

Put together a boy who can char animals, a hypochondriac who behaves like a prince, some Yorkshire slang, and lots of Magic, you have a typical Burnett book – magical and charming.

Despite all it’s beauty, I hated the racist point of view that the narrator has towards India. It is completely different from what she portrays, and she twists history according to her own whims and fancies. But seeing that racism wasn’t a crime back then, I (generously) forgive her.

The part I love the most about this is the transformation of the selfish, wicked, Mary to an angel who wins everyone’s heart by the end. Filled with hope and positivity, you are sure to love this everlasting classic.

I’ll rate it **** out of *****.

Have you read this book? What do you think about it?

Gallery

Lalbagh Flower Show

Home Sweet Home

We had just newly arrived to Bangalore from Mumbai when we set our eyes on a beautiful house. An independent house with two storeys. Plants and animals all around it. A calm, gentle breeze blowing. We all fell in love with it.

Though it was located near the main road, the peaceful atmosphere was maintained. We had lots of friendly neighbours who helped us settle in. Our neighbour grew a lot of plants, so the natural feel in the house was even more increased. Gradually, we settled in.

In the morn, as soon as you stepped out of the door, cool breeze whipped your face. The acupuncture veranda beckoned you to jog. Outside, the road was buzzing with activity. Women making rangoli, flower-sellers calling out their flowers, children getting ready for school, well, I am getting tired now.

In the noon, dogs will be lying sullenly under cars on the road. Cows are swatting flies with their tails. People sigh and fan themselves. The atmosphere is hot and sluggish.

Morning repeated itself in evening. The same old scenes – except children are visibly more happy, playing under the Evening Star.

It’s night now. There is nobody on the road. The dogs are fast asleep. People yawn and wish each other good night. The day ends.

 

For Writing 101, Day Eleven